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Online grocery shopping

September 16th, 2015 3:03 PM

By Southern Star Team

Salted caramel popcorn pots

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Grocery shopping as we know it is changing – whether you’re buying for your family or for a busy restaurant kitchen. Some even believe the time will come when we’ll no longer need to go to the supermarket as a result in the rise of online grocery shopping.

Online grocery retailing in the UK is projected to double in value from 5.5bn to 10.9bn in 2015 fuelled by technological developments, greater consumer confidence in online retail generally and significant improvements in delivery/collection methods and accuracy.

Although online sales represented only 2% of total grocery sales in the UK in 2008, it is predicted that by 2015 this will increase to 5.4%. Currently most popular amongst younger consumers, families and more affluent consumers, online grocery shopping will undoubtedly become increasingly widespread among the mainstream population.

In Ireland, online grocery retail is currently held back by a relatively low broadband penetration and logistical issues. However key market players such as SuperValu and Tesco are keen to expand their online operations in Ireland over the next five years or so.

People who are housebound due to ill health or some other reason are obvious potential beneficiaries of such a service which allows them to order from the comfort of their home and have their essentials delivered directly to their door.

In my opinion this is fine under those circumstances, but it’s hard to beat being able to view and perhaps even handle goods such as veg, fish and fresh meat yourself so you can get them just as you like them. I don’t particularly want someone else selecting my fresh produce – they may have different ideas to me as to what’s right and what’s not, what’s ripe or not or they may be less interested in getting me the best value for my money in terms of quality and freshness. Also the family shop can be a bit of an outing (and an education) for the kids. I also think that new products to the market, especially from smaller local producers, will not benefit from online shopping, because in-store tastings and demonstrations can be an invaluable way to get the message out there.

Another possibility is that there may be warehouses of food that you buy direct from, almost like a cash & carry. It’d be a shame to think that future generations might grow up without understanding the real experiences and interactions involved in a trip to the shops though, and there are the potential implications for employment within the sector to be considered too.

I feel that the local grocery shop is a vital part of the community and being able to walk in there to do your shopping serves a multitude of purposes in terms of the economy, value to the customer and food education for future generations.

Anyone that would like to write to me or anything that they might want me to answer please use the Face book URL to become a friend of mine

www.facebook.com/tlcletsgetcooking

www.facebook.com/matthew.brownie.77

www.scratchmypork.com

Salted caramel popcorn pots

Ingredients

400ml double cream

200ml milk

140g toffee popcorn, plus a little to serve

2 gelatine leaves

4 tbsp caramel from a can

quarter to half a teaspoon of flaky sea salt

Method

1. Pour the cream and milk into a large pan, add the popcorn and bring to a gentle simmer, pushing the popcorn under the liquid and squashing gently on the bottom of the pan.

2. Bubble for one minute, then remove from the heat, transfer to a jug and chill for at least six hours, or preferably overnight.

3. Strain the popcorn cream back into a clean pan and gently reheat, discarding the remaining bits of popcorn.

4. Meanwhile, place the gelatine leaves in cold water to soften for three to five minutes.

5. When the popcorn cream is steaming and the gelatine is soft, remove it from the water and squeeze out any excess drops. Place in the hot popcorn cream and stir until dissolved. Set aside to cool a little.

6. Mix the caramel with the sea salt – start with a quarter tsp, taste, then add more if you think it needs it. Divide the salted caramel between two glasses or pots. Pour the popcorn cream on top and chill for at least two hours, or overnight.

7. Serve each pot topped with a few pieces of toffee popcorn and dive in!

Chef’s tip

Use a wafer biscuit to scoop out

the popcorn pops!

Grocery shopping as we know it is changing – whether you’re buying for your family or for a busy restaurant kitchen. Some even believe the time will come when we’ll no longer need to go to the supermarket as a result in the rise of online grocery shopping.

Online grocery retailing in the UK is projected to double in value from 5.5bn to 10.9bn in 2015 fuelled by technological developments, greater consumer confidence in online retail generally and significant improvements in delivery/collection methods and accuracy.

Although online sales represented only 2% of total grocery sales in the UK in 2008, it is predicted that by 2015 this will increase to 5.4%. Currently most popular amongst younger consumers, families and more affluent consumers, online grocery shopping will undoubtedly become increasingly widespread among the mainstream population.

In Ireland, online grocery retail is currently held back by a relatively low broadband penetration and logistical issues. However key market players such as SuperValu and Tesco are keen to expand their online operations in Ireland over the next five years or so.

People who are housebound due to ill health or some other reason are obvious potential beneficiaries of such a service which allows them to order from the comfort of their home and have their essentials delivered directly to their door.

In my opinion this is fine under those circumstances, but it’s hard to beat being able to view and perhaps even handle goods such as veg, fish and fresh meat yourself so you can get them just as you like them. I don’t particularly want someone else selecting my fresh produce – they may have different ideas to me as to what’s right and what’s not, what’s ripe or not or they may be less interested in getting me the best value for my money in terms of quality and freshness. Also the family shop can be a bit of an outing (and an education) for the kids. I also think that new products to the market, especially from smaller local producers, will not benefit from online shopping, because in-store tastings and demonstrations can be an invaluable way to get the message out there.

Another possibility is that there may be warehouses of food that you buy direct from, almost like a cash & carry. It’d be a shame to think that future generations might grow up without understanding the real experiences and interactions involved in a trip to the shops though, and there are the potential implications for employment within the sector to be considered too.

I feel that the local grocery shop is a vital part of the community and being able to walk in there to do your shopping serves a multitude of purposes in terms of the economy, value to the customer and food education for future generations.

Anyone that would like to write to me or anything that they might want me to answer please use the Face book URL to become a friend of mine

www.facebook.com/tlcletsgetcooking

www.facebook.com/matthew.brownie.77

www.scratchmypork.com

Salted caramel popcorn pots

Ingredients

400ml double cream

200ml milk

140g toffee popcorn, plus a little to serve

2 gelatine leaves

4 tbsp caramel from a can

quarter to half a teaspoon of flaky sea salt

Method

1. Pour the cream and milk into a large pan, add the popcorn and bring to a gentle simmer, pushing the popcorn under the liquid and squashing gently on the bottom of the pan.

2. Bubble for one minute, then remove from the heat, transfer to a jug and chill for at least six hours, or preferably overnight.

3. Strain the popcorn cream back into a clean pan and gently reheat, discarding the remaining bits of popcorn.

4. Meanwhile, place the gelatine leaves in cold water to soften for three to five minutes.

5. When the popcorn cream is steaming and the gelatine is soft, remove it from the water and squeeze out any excess drops. Place in the hot popcorn cream and stir until dissolved. Set aside to cool a little.

6. Mix the caramel with the sea salt – start with a quarter tsp, taste, then add more if you think it needs it. Divide the salted caramel between two glasses or pots. Pour the popcorn cream on top and chill for at least two hours, or overnight.

7. Serve each pot topped with a few pieces of toffee popcorn and dive in!

Chef’s tip

Use a wafer biscuit to scoop out

the popcorn pops!

Grocery shopping as we know it is changing – whether you’re buying for your family or for a busy restaurant kitchen. Some even believe the time will come when we’ll no longer need to go to the supermarket as a result in the rise of online grocery shopping.

Online grocery retailing in the UK is projected to double in value from 5.5bn to 10.9bn in 2015 fuelled by technological developments, greater consumer confidence in online retail generally and significant improvements in delivery/collection methods and accuracy.

Although online sales represented only 2% of total grocery sales in the UK in 2008, it is predicted that by 2015 this will increase to 5.4%. Currently most popular amongst younger consumers, families and more affluent consumers, online grocery shopping will undoubtedly become increasingly widespread among the mainstream population.

In Ireland, online grocery retail is currently held back by a relatively low broadband penetration and logistical issues. However key market players such as SuperValu and Tesco are keen to expand their online operations in Ireland over the next five years or so.

People who are housebound due to ill health or some other reason are obvious potential beneficiaries of such a service which allows them to order from the comfort of their home and have their essentials delivered directly to their door.

In my opinion this is fine under those circumstances, but it’s hard to beat being able to view and perhaps even handle goods such as veg, fish and fresh meat yourself so you can get them just as you like them. I don’t particularly want someone else selecting my fresh produce – they may have different ideas to me as to what’s right and what’s not, what’s ripe or not or they may be less interested in getting me the best value for my money in terms of quality and freshness. Also the family shop can be a bit of an outing (and an education) for the kids. I also think that new products to the market, especially from smaller local producers, will not benefit from online shopping, because in-store tastings and demonstrations can be an invaluable way to get the message out there.

Another possibility is that there may be warehouses of food that you buy direct from, almost like a cash & carry. It’d be a shame to think that future generations might grow up without understanding the real experiences and interactions involved in a trip to the shops though, and there are the potential implications for employment within the sector to be considered too.

I feel that the local grocery shop is a vital part of the community and being able to walk in there to do your shopping serves a multitude of purposes in terms of the economy, value to the customer and food education for future generations.

Anyone that would like to write to me or anything that they might want me to answer please use the Face book URL to become a friend of mine

www.facebook.com/tlcletsgetcooking

www.facebook.com/matthew.brownie.77

www.scratchmypork.com

Salted caramel popcorn pots

Ingredients

400ml double cream

200ml milk

140g toffee popcorn, plus a little to serve

2 gelatine leaves

4 tbsp caramel from a can

quarter to half a teaspoon of flaky sea salt

Method

1. Pour the cream and milk into a large pan, add the popcorn and bring to a gentle simmer, pushing the popcorn under the liquid and squashing gently on the bottom of the pan.

2. Bubble for one minute, then remove from the heat, transfer to a jug and chill for at least six hours, or preferably overnight.

3. Strain the popcorn cream back into a clean pan and gently reheat, discarding the remaining bits of popcorn.

4. Meanwhile, place the gelatine leaves in cold water to soften for three to five minutes.

5. When the popcorn cream is steaming and the gelatine is soft, remove it from the water and squeeze out any excess drops. Place in the hot popcorn cream and stir until dissolved. Set aside to cool a little.

6. Mix the caramel with the sea salt – start with a quarter tsp, taste, then add more if you think it needs it. Divide the salted caramel between two glasses or pots. Pour the popcorn cream on top and chill for at least two hours, or overnight.

7. Serve each pot topped with a few pieces of toffee popcorn and dive in!

Chef’s tip

Use a wafer biscuit to scoop out

the popcorn pops!

Grocery shopping as we know it is changing – whether you’re buying for your family or for a busy restaurant kitchen. Some even believe the time will come when we’ll no longer need to go to the supermarket as a result in the rise of online grocery shopping.

Online grocery retailing in the UK is projected to double in value from 5.5bn to 10.9bn in 2015 fuelled by technological developments, greater consumer confidence in online retail generally and significant improvements in delivery/collection methods and accuracy.

Although online sales represented only 2% of total grocery sales in the UK in 2008, it is predicted that by 2015 this will increase to 5.4%. Currently most popular amongst younger consumers, families and more affluent consumers, online grocery shopping will undoubtedly become increasingly widespread among the mainstream population.

In Ireland, online grocery retail is currently held back by a relatively low broadband penetration and logistical issues. However key market players such as SuperValu and Tesco are keen to expand their online operations in Ireland over the next five years or so.

People who are housebound due to ill health or some other reason are obvious potential beneficiaries of such a service which allows them to order from the comfort of their home and have their essentials delivered directly to their door.

In my opinion this is fine under those circumstances, but it’s hard to beat being able to view and perhaps even handle goods such as veg, fish and fresh meat yourself so you can get them just as you like them. I don’t particularly want someone else selecting my fresh produce – they may have different ideas to me as to what’s right and what’s not, what’s ripe or not or they may be less interested in getting me the best value for my money in terms of quality and freshness. Also the family shop can be a bit of an outing (and an education) for the kids. I also think that new products to the market, especially from smaller local producers, will not benefit from online shopping, because in-store tastings and demonstrations can be an invaluable way to get the message out there.

Another possibility is that there may be warehouses of food that you buy direct from, almost like a cash & carry. It’d be a shame to think that future generations might grow up without understanding the real experiences and interactions involved in a trip to the shops though, and there are the potential implications for employment within the sector to be considered too.

I feel that the local grocery shop is a vital part of the community and being able to walk in there to do your shopping serves a multitude of purposes in terms of the economy, value to the customer and food education for future generations.

Anyone that would like to write to me or anything that they might want me to answer please use the Face book URL to become a friend of mine

www.facebook.com/tlcletsgetcooking

www.facebook.com/matthew.brownie.77

www.scratchmypork.com

Salted caramel popcorn pots

Ingredients

400ml double cream

200ml milk

140g toffee popcorn, plus a little to serve

2 gelatine leaves

4 tbsp caramel from a can

quarter to half a teaspoon of flaky sea salt

Method

1. Pour the cream and milk into a large pan, add the popcorn and bring to a gentle simmer, pushing the popcorn under the liquid and squashing gently on the bottom of the pan.

2. Bubble for one minute, then remove from the heat, transfer to a jug and chill for at least six hours, or preferably overnight.

3. Strain the popcorn cream back into a clean pan and gently reheat, discarding the remaining bits of popcorn.

4. Meanwhile, place the gelatine leaves in cold water to soften for three to five minutes.

5. When the popcorn cream is steaming and the gelatine is soft, remove it from the water and squeeze out any excess drops. Place in the hot popcorn cream and stir until dissolved. Set aside to cool a little.

6. Mix the caramel with the sea salt – start with a quarter tsp, taste, then add more if you think it needs it. Divide the salted caramel between two glasses or pots. Pour the popcorn cream on top and chill for at least two hours, or overnight.

7. Serve each pot topped with a few pieces of toffee popcorn and dive in!

Chef’s tip

Use a wafer biscuit to scoop out

the popcorn pops!

Grocery shopping as we know it is changing – whether you’re buying for your family or for a busy restaurant kitchen. Some even believe the time will come when we’ll no longer need to go to the supermarket as a result in the rise of online grocery shopping.

Online grocery retailing in the UK is projected to double in value from 5.5bn to 10.9bn in 2015 fuelled by technological developments, greater consumer confidence in online retail generally and significant improvements in delivery/collection methods and accuracy.

Although online sales represented only 2% of total grocery sales in the UK in 2008, it is predicted that by 2015 this will increase to 5.4%. Currently most popular amongst younger consumers, families and more affluent consumers, online grocery shopping will undoubtedly become increasingly widespread among the mainstream population.

In Ireland, online grocery retail is currently held back by a relatively low broadband penetration and logistical issues. However key market players such as SuperValu and Tesco are keen to expand their online operations in Ireland over the next five years or so.

People who are housebound due to ill health or some other reason are obvious potential beneficiaries of such a service which allows them to order from the comfort of their home and have their essentials delivered directly to their door.

In my opinion this is fine under those circumstances, but it’s hard to beat being able to view and perhaps even handle goods such as veg, fish and fresh meat yourself so you can get them just as you like them. I don’t particularly want someone else selecting my fresh produce – they may have different ideas to me as to what’s right and what’s not, what’s ripe or not or they may be less interested in getting me the best value for my money in terms of quality and freshness. Also the family shop can be a bit of an outing (and an education) for the kids. I also think that new products to the market, especially from smaller local producers, will not benefit from online shopping, because in-store tastings and demonstrations can be an invaluable way to get the message out there.

Another possibility is that there may be warehouses of food that you buy direct from, almost like a cash & carry. It’d be a shame to think that future generations might grow up without understanding the real experiences and interactions involved in a trip to the shops though, and there are the potential implications for employment within the sector to be considered too.

I feel that the local grocery shop is a vital part of the community and being able to walk in there to do your shopping serves a multitude of purposes in terms of the economy, value to the customer and food education for future generations.

Anyone that would like to write to me or anything that they might want me to answer please use the Face book URL to become a friend of mine

www.facebook.com/tlcletsgetcooking

www.facebook.com/matthew.brownie.77

www.scratchmypork.com

Salted caramel popcorn pots

Ingredients

400ml double cream

200ml milk

140g toffee popcorn, plus a little to serve

2 gelatine leaves

4 tbsp caramel from a can

quarter to half a teaspoon of flaky sea salt

Method

1. Pour the cream and milk into a large pan, add the popcorn and bring to a gentle simmer, pushing the popcorn under the liquid and squashing gently on the bottom of the pan.

2. Bubble for one minute, then remove from the heat, transfer to a jug and chill for at least six hours, or preferably overnight.

3. Strain the popcorn cream back into a clean pan and gently reheat, discarding the remaining bits of popcorn.

4. Meanwhile, place the gelatine leaves in cold water to soften for three to five minutes.

5. When the popcorn cream is steaming and the gelatine is soft, remove it from the water and squeeze out any excess drops. Place in the hot popcorn cream and stir until dissolved. Set aside to cool a little.

6. Mix the caramel with the sea salt – start with a quarter tsp, taste, then add more if you think it needs it. Divide the salted caramel between two glasses or pots. Pour the popcorn cream on top and chill for at least two hours, or overnight.

7. Serve each pot topped with a few pieces of toffee popcorn and dive in!

Chef’s tip

Use a wafer biscuit to scoop out

the popcorn pops!

Grocery shopping as we know it is changing – whether you’re buying for your family or for a busy restaurant kitchen. Some even believe the time will come when we’ll no longer need to go to the supermarket as a result in the rise of online grocery shopping.

Online grocery retailing in the UK is projected to double in value from 5.5bn to 10.9bn in 2015 fuelled by technological developments, greater consumer confidence in online retail generally and significant improvements in delivery/collection methods and accuracy.

Although online sales represented only 2% of total grocery sales in the UK in 2008, it is predicted that by 2015 this will increase to 5.4%. Currently most popular amongst younger consumers, families and more affluent consumers, online grocery shopping will undoubtedly become increasingly widespread among the mainstream population.

In Ireland, online grocery retail is currently held back by a relatively low broadband penetration and logistical issues. However key market players such as SuperValu and Tesco are keen to expand their online operations in Ireland over the next five years or so.

People who are housebound due to ill health or some other reason are obvious potential beneficiaries of such a service which allows them to order from the comfort of their home and have their essentials delivered directly to their door.

In my opinion this is fine under those circumstances, but it’s hard to beat being able to view and perhaps even handle goods such as veg, fish and fresh meat yourself so you can get them just as you like them. I don’t particularly want someone else selecting my fresh produce – they may have different ideas to me as to what’s right and what’s not, what’s ripe or not or they may be less interested in getting me the best value for my money in terms of quality and freshness. Also the family shop can be a bit of an outing (and an education) for the kids. I also think that new products to the market, especially from smaller local producers, will not benefit from online shopping, because in-store tastings and demonstrations can be an invaluable way to get the message out there.

Another possibility is that there may be warehouses of food that you buy direct from, almost like a cash & carry. It’d be a shame to think that future generations might grow up without understanding the real experiences and interactions involved in a trip to the shops though, and there are the potential implications for employment within the sector to be considered too.

I feel that the local grocery shop is a vital part of the community and being able to walk in there to do your shopping serves a multitude of purposes in terms of the economy, value to the customer and food education for future generations.

Anyone that would like to write to me or anything that they might want me to answer please use the Face book URL to become a friend of mine

www.facebook.com/tlcletsgetcooking

www.facebook.com/matthew.brownie.77

www.scratchmypork.com

Salted caramel popcorn pots

Ingredients

400ml double cream

200ml milk

140g toffee popcorn, plus a little to serve

2 gelatine leaves

4 tbsp caramel from a can

quarter to half a teaspoon of flaky sea salt

Method

1. Pour the cream and milk into a large pan, add the popcorn and bring to a gentle simmer, pushing the popcorn under the liquid and squashing gently on the bottom of the pan.

2. Bubble for one minute, then remove from the heat, transfer to a jug and chill for at least six hours, or preferably overnight.

3. Strain the popcorn cream back into a clean pan and gently reheat, discarding the remaining bits of popcorn.

4. Meanwhile, place the gelatine leaves in cold water to soften for three to five minutes.

5. When the popcorn cream is steaming and the gelatine is soft, remove it from the water and squeeze out any excess drops. Place in the hot popcorn cream and stir until dissolved. Set aside to cool a little.

6. Mix the caramel with the sea salt – start with a quarter tsp, taste, then add more if you think it needs it. Divide the salted caramel between two glasses or pots. Pour the popcorn cream on top and chill for at least two hours, or overnight.

7. Serve each pot topped with a few pieces of toffee popcorn and dive in!

Chef’s tip

Use a wafer biscuit to scoop out

the popcorn pops!

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