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Locals save 1933 seawall in Allihies

September 22nd, 2015 7:20 AM

By Southern Star Team

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BY JACKIE KEOGH

CONCERNED locals in Allihies have saved a beautiful old seawall that was in danger of being defaced by repairs.

The Trá na Phearla wall, which was built by the people of Reentrisk and North Allihies in 1933, had stood the test of time, but a storm in January 2014 knocked some of the stones out of the centre of the structure and dislodged others. The damage meant there was a real danger that the entire wall could have collapsed during another storm, and maybe even the road too.

On Tuesday, locals who had been campaigning to have the beauty of the wall preserved met with the local area engineer, Aidan Prendergast, and they confirmed that a solution has been found.

Even the name of the wall Trá na Phearla – which means the strand of the pearl – is reflective of local history because a ship named ‘The Pearl’ was wrecked there hundreds of years ago.

Initially, the Council had proposed shuttering the existing wall and facing it with concrete, but the full-time residents of the townlands of Reentrisk and North Allihies argued that it would destroy the beauty of what is an exceptional stretch of the Wild Atlantic Way.

The area engineer has since confirmed that the Council will now build a new wall – using local tradesmen and local stone – which will be set out from the existing wall, and the space between the two walls will be backfilled with reinforced concrete, thereby ensuring that it is structurally sound.

BY JACKIE KEOGH

CONCERNED locals in Allihies have saved a beautiful old seawall that was in danger of being defaced by repairs.

The Trá na Phearla wall, which was built by the people of Reentrisk and North Allihies in 1933, had stood the test of time, but a storm in January 2014 knocked some of the stones out of the centre of the structure and dislodged others. The damage meant there was a real danger that the entire wall could have collapsed during another storm, and maybe even the road too.

On Tuesday, locals who had been campaigning to have the beauty of the wall preserved met with the local area engineer, Aidan Prendergast, and they confirmed that a solution has been found.

Even the name of the wall Trá na Phearla – which means the strand of the pearl – is reflective of local history because a ship named ‘The Pearl’ was wrecked there hundreds of years ago.

Initially, the Council had proposed shuttering the existing wall and facing it with concrete, but the full-time residents of the townlands of Reentrisk and North Allihies argued that it would destroy the beauty of what is an exceptional stretch of the Wild Atlantic Way.

The area engineer has since confirmed that the Council will now build a new wall – using local tradesmen and local stone – which will be set out from the existing wall, and the space between the two walls will be backfilled with reinforced concrete, thereby ensuring that it is structurally sound.

BY JACKIE KEOGH

CONCERNED locals in Allihies have saved a beautiful old seawall that was in danger of being defaced by repairs.

The Trá na Phearla wall, which was built by the people of Reentrisk and North Allihies in 1933, had stood the test of time, but a storm in January 2014 knocked some of the stones out of the centre of the structure and dislodged others. The damage meant there was a real danger that the entire wall could have collapsed during another storm, and maybe even the road too.

On Tuesday, locals who had been campaigning to have the beauty of the wall preserved met with the local area engineer, Aidan Prendergast, and they confirmed that a solution has been found.

Even the name of the wall Trá na Phearla – which means the strand of the pearl – is reflective of local history because a ship named ‘The Pearl’ was wrecked there hundreds of years ago.

Initially, the Council had proposed shuttering the existing wall and facing it with concrete, but the full-time residents of the townlands of Reentrisk and North Allihies argued that it would destroy the beauty of what is an exceptional stretch of the Wild Atlantic Way.

The area engineer has since confirmed that the Council will now build a new wall – using local tradesmen and local stone – which will be set out from the existing wall, and the space between the two walls will be backfilled with reinforced concrete, thereby ensuring that it is structurally sound.

BY JACKIE KEOGH

CONCERNED locals in Allihies have saved a beautiful old seawall that was in danger of being defaced by repairs.

The Trá na Phearla wall, which was built by the people of Reentrisk and North Allihies in 1933, had stood the test of time, but a storm in January 2014 knocked some of the stones out of the centre of the structure and dislodged others. The damage meant there was a real danger that the entire wall could have collapsed during another storm, and maybe even the road too.

On Tuesday, locals who had been campaigning to have the beauty of the wall preserved met with the local area engineer, Aidan Prendergast, and they confirmed that a solution has been found.

Even the name of the wall Trá na Phearla – which means the strand of the pearl – is reflective of local history because a ship named ‘The Pearl’ was wrecked there hundreds of years ago.

Initially, the Council had proposed shuttering the existing wall and facing it with concrete, but the full-time residents of the townlands of Reentrisk and North Allihies argued that it would destroy the beauty of what is an exceptional stretch of the Wild Atlantic Way.

The area engineer has since confirmed that the Council will now build a new wall – using local tradesmen and local stone – which will be set out from the existing wall, and the space between the two walls will be backfilled with reinforced concrete, thereby ensuring that it is structurally sound.

BY JACKIE KEOGH

CONCERNED locals in Allihies have saved a beautiful old seawall that was in danger of being defaced by repairs.

The Trá na Phearla wall, which was built by the people of Reentrisk and North Allihies in 1933, had stood the test of time, but a storm in January 2014 knocked some of the stones out of the centre of the structure and dislodged others. The damage meant there was a real danger that the entire wall could have collapsed during another storm, and maybe even the road too.

On Tuesday, locals who had been campaigning to have the beauty of the wall preserved met with the local area engineer, Aidan Prendergast, and they confirmed that a solution has been found.

Even the name of the wall Trá na Phearla – which means the strand of the pearl – is reflective of local history because a ship named ‘The Pearl’ was wrecked there hundreds of years ago.

Initially, the Council had proposed shuttering the existing wall and facing it with concrete, but the full-time residents of the townlands of Reentrisk and North Allihies argued that it would destroy the beauty of what is an exceptional stretch of the Wild Atlantic Way.

The area engineer has since confirmed that the Council will now build a new wall – using local tradesmen and local stone – which will be set out from the existing wall, and the space between the two walls will be backfilled with reinforced concrete, thereby ensuring that it is structurally sound.

BY JACKIE KEOGH

CONCERNED locals in Allihies have saved a beautiful old seawall that was in danger of being defaced by repairs.

The Trá na Phearla wall, which was built by the people of Reentrisk and North Allihies in 1933, had stood the test of time, but a storm in January 2014 knocked some of the stones out of the centre of the structure and dislodged others. The damage meant there was a real danger that the entire wall could have collapsed during another storm, and maybe even the road too.

On Tuesday, locals who had been campaigning to have the beauty of the wall preserved met with the local area engineer, Aidan Prendergast, and they confirmed that a solution has been found.

Even the name of the wall Trá na Phearla – which means the strand of the pearl – is reflective of local history because a ship named ‘The Pearl’ was wrecked there hundreds of years ago.

Initially, the Council had proposed shuttering the existing wall and facing it with concrete, but the full-time residents of the townlands of Reentrisk and North Allihies argued that it would destroy the beauty of what is an exceptional stretch of the Wild Atlantic Way.

The area engineer has since confirmed that the Council will now build a new wall – using local tradesmen and local stone – which will be set out from the existing wall, and the space between the two walls will be backfilled with reinforced concrete, thereby ensuring that it is structurally sound.

BY JACKIE KEOGH

CONCERNED locals in Allihies have saved a beautiful old seawall that was in danger of being defaced by repairs.

The Trá na Phearla wall, which was built by the people of Reentrisk and North Allihies in 1933, had stood the test of time, but a storm in January 2014 knocked some of the stones out of the centre of the structure and dislodged others. The damage meant there was a real danger that the entire wall could have collapsed during another storm, and maybe even the road too.

On Tuesday, locals who had been campaigning to have the beauty of the wall preserved met with the local area engineer, Aidan Prendergast, and they confirmed that a solution has been found.

Even the name of the wall Trá na Phearla – which means the strand of the pearl – is reflective of local history because a ship named ‘The Pearl’ was wrecked there hundreds of years ago.

Initially, the Council had proposed shuttering the existing wall and facing it with concrete, but the full-time residents of the townlands of Reentrisk and North Allihies argued that it would destroy the beauty of what is an exceptional stretch of the Wild Atlantic Way.

The area engineer has since confirmed that the Council will now build a new wall – using local tradesmen and local stone – which will be set out from the existing wall, and the space between the two walls will be backfilled with reinforced concrete, thereby ensuring that it is structurally sound.

BY JACKIE KEOGH

CONCERNED locals in Allihies have saved a beautiful old seawall that was in danger of being defaced by repairs.

The Trá na Phearla wall, which was built by the people of Reentrisk and North Allihies in 1933, had stood the test of time, but a storm in January 2014 knocked some of the stones out of the centre of the structure and dislodged others. The damage meant there was a real danger that the entire wall could have collapsed during another storm, and maybe even the road too.

On Tuesday, locals who had been campaigning to have the beauty of the wall preserved met with the local area engineer, Aidan Prendergast, and they confirmed that a solution has been found.

Even the name of the wall Trá na Phearla – which means the strand of the pearl – is reflective of local history because a ship named ‘The Pearl’ was wrecked there hundreds of years ago.

Initially, the Council had proposed shuttering the existing wall and facing it with concrete, but the full-time residents of the townlands of Reentrisk and North Allihies argued that it would destroy the beauty of what is an exceptional stretch of the Wild Atlantic Way.

The area engineer has since confirmed that the Council will now build a new wall – using local tradesmen and local stone – which will be set out from the existing wall, and the space between the two walls will be backfilled with reinforced concrete, thereby ensuring that it is structurally sound.

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