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Mizen caf has a unique selling point its location

September 14th, 2015 5:46 PM

By Southern Star Team

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BY JACKIE KEOGH

THE furthest reaches of the Mizen Peninsula is probably the most unlikely place for an enterprising couple to open a café.

But Lukas Ungerer and his wife, Joanne, realised that the unique selling point of such a venture would be its famous landmark, Three Castle Head.

Walkers of all ages and abilities, both domestic and international, visit the ruins of Dunlough Castle and, in the process, have an unforgettable experience.

‘It had always been an idea of ours to convert the old tractor barn and turn it into a café during the summer months and create a wedding venue during the shoulder season,’ said Lukas.

‘So far,’ Joanne said, ‘the café has been doing a roaring trade with an average of a 150 people a day at the height of the season.’

Lukas and Joanne have created four full-time jobs, but Lukas admitted: ‘We have also press-ganged a lot of family and friends who are keen to see our emerging business do well.’

Two years ago, when they got married, Joanne, who is a native of Wexford, said: ‘There was no other venue for me – it had to be Three Castle Head.’

The location is certainly like any other – a place that is beautiful, magical and mysterious. It is also the place where Yvonne Ungerer began rearing sheep – a business that Lukas took over ten years ago and developed to the point where his produce, particular his artisan lamb, is still very much in demand.

‘When we got married we had a makeshift bar in the barn and that is where the inspiration came from,’ said Joanne, who explained that they have put a lot of work into creating a modern, professional catering kitchen, as well as a new toilet block, a charming dining room, an outdoor seating area, and a large car park.

‘We knew it would go well because we already had a passing trade with walkers,’ said Lukas, ‘but we are genuine pleased that so many people appreciate what we are doing. It is unusual to find a café in such a remote area, but it works.’

Now, Joanne said: ‘We are looking forward to a season of hosting small, intimate weddings in a place that is impossibly romantic.’

BY JACKIE KEOGH

THE furthest reaches of the Mizen Peninsula is probably the most unlikely place for an enterprising couple to open a café.

But Lukas Ungerer and his wife, Joanne, realised that the unique selling point of such a venture would be its famous landmark, Three Castle Head.

Walkers of all ages and abilities, both domestic and international, visit the ruins of Dunlough Castle and, in the process, have an unforgettable experience.

‘It had always been an idea of ours to convert the old tractor barn and turn it into a café during the summer months and create a wedding venue during the shoulder season,’ said Lukas.

‘So far,’ Joanne said, ‘the café has been doing a roaring trade with an average of a 150 people a day at the height of the season.’

Lukas and Joanne have created four full-time jobs, but Lukas admitted: ‘We have also press-ganged a lot of family and friends who are keen to see our emerging business do well.’

Two years ago, when they got married, Joanne, who is a native of Wexford, said: ‘There was no other venue for me – it had to be Three Castle Head.’

The location is certainly like any other – a place that is beautiful, magical and mysterious. It is also the place where Yvonne Ungerer began rearing sheep – a business that Lukas took over ten years ago and developed to the point where his produce, particular his artisan lamb, is still very much in demand.

‘When we got married we had a makeshift bar in the barn and that is where the inspiration came from,’ said Joanne, who explained that they have put a lot of work into creating a modern, professional catering kitchen, as well as a new toilet block, a charming dining room, an outdoor seating area, and a large car park.

‘We knew it would go well because we already had a passing trade with walkers,’ said Lukas, ‘but we are genuine pleased that so many people appreciate what we are doing. It is unusual to find a café in such a remote area, but it works.’

Now, Joanne said: ‘We are looking forward to a season of hosting small, intimate weddings in a place that is impossibly romantic.’

BY JACKIE KEOGH

THE furthest reaches of the Mizen Peninsula is probably the most unlikely place for an enterprising couple to open a café.

But Lukas Ungerer and his wife, Joanne, realised that the unique selling point of such a venture would be its famous landmark, Three Castle Head.

Walkers of all ages and abilities, both domestic and international, visit the ruins of Dunlough Castle and, in the process, have an unforgettable experience.

‘It had always been an idea of ours to convert the old tractor barn and turn it into a café during the summer months and create a wedding venue during the shoulder season,’ said Lukas.

‘So far,’ Joanne said, ‘the café has been doing a roaring trade with an average of a 150 people a day at the height of the season.’

Lukas and Joanne have created four full-time jobs, but Lukas admitted: ‘We have also press-ganged a lot of family and friends who are keen to see our emerging business do well.’

Two years ago, when they got married, Joanne, who is a native of Wexford, said: ‘There was no other venue for me – it had to be Three Castle Head.’

The location is certainly like any other – a place that is beautiful, magical and mysterious. It is also the place where Yvonne Ungerer began rearing sheep – a business that Lukas took over ten years ago and developed to the point where his produce, particular his artisan lamb, is still very much in demand.

‘When we got married we had a makeshift bar in the barn and that is where the inspiration came from,’ said Joanne, who explained that they have put a lot of work into creating a modern, professional catering kitchen, as well as a new toilet block, a charming dining room, an outdoor seating area, and a large car park.

‘We knew it would go well because we already had a passing trade with walkers,’ said Lukas, ‘but we are genuine pleased that so many people appreciate what we are doing. It is unusual to find a café in such a remote area, but it works.’

Now, Joanne said: ‘We are looking forward to a season of hosting small, intimate weddings in a place that is impossibly romantic.’

BY JACKIE KEOGH

THE furthest reaches of the Mizen Peninsula is probably the most unlikely place for an enterprising couple to open a café.

But Lukas Ungerer and his wife, Joanne, realised that the unique selling point of such a venture would be its famous landmark, Three Castle Head.

Walkers of all ages and abilities, both domestic and international, visit the ruins of Dunlough Castle and, in the process, have an unforgettable experience.

‘It had always been an idea of ours to convert the old tractor barn and turn it into a café during the summer months and create a wedding venue during the shoulder season,’ said Lukas.

‘So far,’ Joanne said, ‘the café has been doing a roaring trade with an average of a 150 people a day at the height of the season.’

Lukas and Joanne have created four full-time jobs, but Lukas admitted: ‘We have also press-ganged a lot of family and friends who are keen to see our emerging business do well.’

Two years ago, when they got married, Joanne, who is a native of Wexford, said: ‘There was no other venue for me – it had to be Three Castle Head.’

The location is certainly like any other – a place that is beautiful, magical and mysterious. It is also the place where Yvonne Ungerer began rearing sheep – a business that Lukas took over ten years ago and developed to the point where his produce, particular his artisan lamb, is still very much in demand.

‘When we got married we had a makeshift bar in the barn and that is where the inspiration came from,’ said Joanne, who explained that they have put a lot of work into creating a modern, professional catering kitchen, as well as a new toilet block, a charming dining room, an outdoor seating area, and a large car park.

‘We knew it would go well because we already had a passing trade with walkers,’ said Lukas, ‘but we are genuine pleased that so many people appreciate what we are doing. It is unusual to find a café in such a remote area, but it works.’

Now, Joanne said: ‘We are looking forward to a season of hosting small, intimate weddings in a place that is impossibly romantic.’

BY JACKIE KEOGH

THE furthest reaches of the Mizen Peninsula is probably the most unlikely place for an enterprising couple to open a café.

But Lukas Ungerer and his wife, Joanne, realised that the unique selling point of such a venture would be its famous landmark, Three Castle Head.

Walkers of all ages and abilities, both domestic and international, visit the ruins of Dunlough Castle and, in the process, have an unforgettable experience.

‘It had always been an idea of ours to convert the old tractor barn and turn it into a café during the summer months and create a wedding venue during the shoulder season,’ said Lukas.

‘So far,’ Joanne said, ‘the café has been doing a roaring trade with an average of a 150 people a day at the height of the season.’

Lukas and Joanne have created four full-time jobs, but Lukas admitted: ‘We have also press-ganged a lot of family and friends who are keen to see our emerging business do well.’

Two years ago, when they got married, Joanne, who is a native of Wexford, said: ‘There was no other venue for me – it had to be Three Castle Head.’

The location is certainly like any other – a place that is beautiful, magical and mysterious. It is also the place where Yvonne Ungerer began rearing sheep – a business that Lukas took over ten years ago and developed to the point where his produce, particular his artisan lamb, is still very much in demand.

‘When we got married we had a makeshift bar in the barn and that is where the inspiration came from,’ said Joanne, who explained that they have put a lot of work into creating a modern, professional catering kitchen, as well as a new toilet block, a charming dining room, an outdoor seating area, and a large car park.

‘We knew it would go well because we already had a passing trade with walkers,’ said Lukas, ‘but we are genuine pleased that so many people appreciate what we are doing. It is unusual to find a café in such a remote area, but it works.’

Now, Joanne said: ‘We are looking forward to a season of hosting small, intimate weddings in a place that is impossibly romantic.’

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