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FARM CLASSICS: The John Deere 6950 – a fine harvesting machine

May 25th, 2023 10:05 PM

By Southern Star Team

Appearance-wise, the harvester is slightly longer and wider than its predecessors and features extensive grill cut-outs to aid engine cooling.

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LAUNCHED in 1997, the 50 series harvester took over the reins of the 10 series and comprised four models – 6650, 6750, 6850 and 6950. Manufactured at the Zweibrucken plant in West Germany, dedicated to forage and combine harvester production, the 50 series at a glance looks quite similar to the outgoing 10 series.

However, there are a few subtle yet substantial differences which made the 50 series, and in particular the 6950, a finely-tuned harvesting machine.

Appearance-wise, the harvester is slightly longer and wider than its predecessors and features extensive grill cut-outs to aid engine cooling, as well as a viscous fan, with a self-cleaning rotary air screen. Foldable rear lighting brackets are mounted to the rear. 

The use of the Cummins N-14 engine for the 6850 was dropped and the big 14l powerhouse was only available for the 6950. Power has been increased to 540hp when sitting at the optimal 1900rpm, with electronic engine management reducing the engine revs to 1650rpm for road transport in third gear.

Crop intake and flow was improved with the introduction of the 3m wide 630A header with compressor plate. 

The crop is fed up to four feed rollers, then through the 66cm-wide chopping cylinder. The silage then passes through a newly-designed 12-paddle blower and up the shoot. 

Both the tower and shoot were increased in diameter by 25% to improve crop flow, with the John Deere claiming a blower band replacement time of just 15 mins. The shoot, with a rotation of 200 degrees, is also angled for more streamlined flow. 

A kernel processor is also mounted in the harvester, with its own winch to install the unit during maize harvesting. 

The cab of the 50 series boasted great levels of comfort and visibility. 

Although similar to its predecessor, the exterior lighting package was upgraded and an area meter was integrated into the armrest as standard.  

The pillar to the right of the operator gives a more comprehensive readout with a more functional engine and speed display screen and is home to the fuel, temperature and as well as warning lights. 

A considerate touch was the illumination of steps at night, as well as a wiper, mounted on the door. 

Contact Peter at [email protected] or see Instagram @flashphotoscork

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