News

Whirlwind tour ends

September 11th, 2015 8:30 PM

By Southern Star Team

Share this article

MÁIRE McCarthy of Innishannon, a Nuffield Scholarship winner, has been travelling around the world investigating farming practices and meeting government agriculture officials across the globe. This week’s final report in the series comes from the United States of America.

We arrived in Washington, DC, on July 3rd, just in time for the national holiday on the 4th July of July; boy do the Americans now how to throw a party and have a parade! Absolutely brilliant.

We spent four hours standing in front of the White House watching the parade pass by – everything from Irish dancers and fire throwers to soldiers and naval officers; amazing! We managed to get up on the roof of our hotel to witness the wonderful fireworks on the night of the 4th.

We visited the White House, National Geographic Museum, Natural History Museum, Capitol Hill and the US Department of agriculture while in Washington.

I spent a Sunday afternoon watching Cork and Kerry play in Irish pub in downtown Washington surrounded by Kerry people; very exciting times, ended in a draw!

Travelling to Delaware State from Washington, we visited a lot a lot of poultry farms – 195,000 free-range organic farm run by a very competent lady and her family. The chickens were very happy, comfortable and clean.

We visited two farms where a farm shop was operated on-farm. They were long-established business with on-farm restaurant and play area. They grew vegetables, fruit and also processed their own ice cream, very innovative hard-working people.

Staying on the coast in a motel, we were walking distance from the beach, so at the end of each day travelling and visiting farms, we would go for a long, cool swim.

At another 650-cow dairy farm, they were in the process of expanding to double their herd. They have an on-farm shop selling ice cream 35 different flavours! They employ 45 scoopers (students who work shifts) as the shop is open from 10am to 10pm and is very busy!

We left Delaware and travelled to Philadelphia where we all parted company I was flying back to Ireland from Chicago, while the rest of the group were returning home out of Los Angeles.

We were very sad to say goodbye, but also delighted to be going home to our families after 45 days of a whirlwind tour of farms across the world.

The conclusion I come to is that we have a wonderful country and probably the best farming practices in the world: our cows eat grass and don’t need any artificial showers to keep cool they have plenty of natural showers! We have a lot to be very proud of here; the quality of our product is the most natural, flavoursome in the world.

I was very proud of the display of Irish products – including Kerrygold butter and Dubliner cheese – in the wholefoods shops in Washington and Delaware.

Wholefoods is a chain of ‘natural, healthy’ supermarkets, which is growing rapidly in the USA.

MÁIRE McCarthy of Innishannon, a Nuffield Scholarship winner, has been travelling around the world investigating farming practices and meeting government agriculture officials across the globe. This week’s final report in the series comes from the United States of America.

We arrived in Washington, DC, on July 3rd, just in time for the national holiday on the 4th July of July; boy do the Americans now how to throw a party and have a parade! Absolutely brilliant.

We spent four hours standing in front of the White House watching the parade pass by – everything from Irish dancers and fire throwers to soldiers and naval officers; amazing! We managed to get up on the roof of our hotel to witness the wonderful fireworks on the night of the 4th.

We visited the White House, National Geographic Museum, Natural History Museum, Capitol Hill and the US Department of agriculture while in Washington.

I spent a Sunday afternoon watching Cork and Kerry play in Irish pub in downtown Washington surrounded by Kerry people; very exciting times, ended in a draw!

Travelling to Delaware State from Washington, we visited a lot a lot of poultry farms – 195,000 free-range organic farm run by a very competent lady and her family. The chickens were very happy, comfortable and clean.

We visited two farms where a farm shop was operated on-farm. They were long-established business with on-farm restaurant and play area. They grew vegetables, fruit and also processed their own ice cream, very innovative hard-working people.

Staying on the coast in a motel, we were walking distance from the beach, so at the end of each day travelling and visiting farms, we would go for a long, cool swim.

At another 650-cow dairy farm, they were in the process of expanding to double their herd. They have an on-farm shop selling ice cream 35 different flavours! They employ 45 scoopers (students who work shifts) as the shop is open from 10am to 10pm and is very busy!

We left Delaware and travelled to Philadelphia where we all parted company I was flying back to Ireland from Chicago, while the rest of the group were returning home out of Los Angeles.

We were very sad to say goodbye, but also delighted to be going home to our families after 45 days of a whirlwind tour of farms across the world.

The conclusion I come to is that we have a wonderful country and probably the best farming practices in the world: our cows eat grass and don’t need any artificial showers to keep cool they have plenty of natural showers! We have a lot to be very proud of here; the quality of our product is the most natural, flavoursome in the world.

I was very proud of the display of Irish products – including Kerrygold butter and Dubliner cheese – in the wholefoods shops in Washington and Delaware.

Wholefoods is a chain of ‘natural, healthy’ supermarkets, which is growing rapidly in the USA.

MÁIRE McCarthy of Innishannon, a Nuffield Scholarship winner, has been travelling around the world investigating farming practices and meeting government agriculture officials across the globe. This week’s final report in the series comes from the United States of America.

We arrived in Washington, DC, on July 3rd, just in time for the national holiday on the 4th July of July; boy do the Americans now how to throw a party and have a parade! Absolutely brilliant.

We spent four hours standing in front of the White House watching the parade pass by – everything from Irish dancers and fire throwers to soldiers and naval officers; amazing! We managed to get up on the roof of our hotel to witness the wonderful fireworks on the night of the 4th.

We visited the White House, National Geographic Museum, Natural History Museum, Capitol Hill and the US Department of agriculture while in Washington.

I spent a Sunday afternoon watching Cork and Kerry play in Irish pub in downtown Washington surrounded by Kerry people; very exciting times, ended in a draw!

Travelling to Delaware State from Washington, we visited a lot a lot of poultry farms – 195,000 free-range organic farm run by a very competent lady and her family. The chickens were very happy, comfortable and clean.

We visited two farms where a farm shop was operated on-farm. They were long-established business with on-farm restaurant and play area. They grew vegetables, fruit and also processed their own ice cream, very innovative hard-working people.

Staying on the coast in a motel, we were walking distance from the beach, so at the end of each day travelling and visiting farms, we would go for a long, cool swim.

At another 650-cow dairy farm, they were in the process of expanding to double their herd. They have an on-farm shop selling ice cream 35 different flavours! They employ 45 scoopers (students who work shifts) as the shop is open from 10am to 10pm and is very busy!

We left Delaware and travelled to Philadelphia where we all parted company I was flying back to Ireland from Chicago, while the rest of the group were returning home out of Los Angeles.

We were very sad to say goodbye, but also delighted to be going home to our families after 45 days of a whirlwind tour of farms across the world.

The conclusion I come to is that we have a wonderful country and probably the best farming practices in the world: our cows eat grass and don’t need any artificial showers to keep cool they have plenty of natural showers! We have a lot to be very proud of here; the quality of our product is the most natural, flavoursome in the world.

I was very proud of the display of Irish products – including Kerrygold butter and Dubliner cheese – in the wholefoods shops in Washington and Delaware.

Wholefoods is a chain of ‘natural, healthy’ supermarkets, which is growing rapidly in the USA.

Share this article

Related content

Subscribe

to our mailing list for the latest news and sport:

Thank You!

You have successfully been subscribed to SouthernStar newsletter!

Form submitting... Thank you for waiting.