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Driver and kids have a lucky escape in flooding

September 19th, 2015 10:10 PM

By Southern Star Team

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By Kieran O’Mahony

A BALLINEEN woman and three children had a very lucky escape on Monday afternoon when their car was swept into flood waters.

The incident happened at Ardkitt near Enniskeane, where the Bandon River had burst its banks.

Rose Crowley was on her way to Desert Cross with three children at around 3pm when they drove through a narrow road that is prone to flooding.

‘There was a lot of surface water on the road, but suddenly water started coming in and it was quite frightening,’ she told The Southern Star. ‘I told the older two children, aged six and nine, to get up onto the back window, because we were getting saturated in the front,’ said Rose.

‘It was scary when I couldn’t open the door, but my priority was to keep the children calm because if I panicked, then they would have too. Once I knew we couldn’t get out, I rang the emergency services and they were great and they kept phoning me back until rescue services arrived.’

Rose and the three children were in the water-filled car for close to an hour and she was relieved to see the Fire Brigade arrive so quickly after she made the initial 999 call.

‘We could hear the sirens and then the voices and then we knew we would be safe. Five firemen got us out of the car and we were saturated, but we were wrapped in foil and blankets to keep warm and the children even got to wear the firemen’s helmets.’

Two ambulances, as well as the gardaí and West Cork Rapid Response were also at the scene, and Rose and the three children were treated for hypothermia, but did not need hospitalisation.

‘Thankfully all four of us were fine and we were dropped home. The children said that it was an adventurous day and that they couldn’t wait to go to school the day after to tell them their news. I think the shock of what happened only hit me the day after it, ’ said Rose.

Dan McCarthy, station officer with Dunmanway Fire Brigade, said that it could have been a tragic disaster.

‘What saved them is that the strong current jammed Rose’s car against the ditch which meant the car wasn’t swept into the river. It was a frightening scene to be honest, as the water was up to the steering wheel,’ said Dan.

‘This road is known for flooding, and if it had happened earlier in the morning when the water was higher, it could have been a tragic disaster.’

Rose had high praise for all those who came to their rescue.

‘The members of Dunmanway Fire Brigade are a total credit to the town. The professionalism, efficiency and calm manner in which they handled a very frightening experience, especially for the children, was second to none,’ said Rose.

‘I also want to give a sincere thanks to the ambulance crew and the gardaí who attended the scene and they were more than sympathetic and helpful, especially to the young children involved.’

By Kieran O’Mahony

A BALLINEEN woman and three children had a very lucky escape on Monday afternoon when their car was swept into flood waters.

The incident happened at Ardkitt near Enniskeane, where the Bandon River had burst its banks.

Rose Crowley was on her way to Desert Cross with three children at around 3pm when they drove through a narrow road that is prone to flooding.

‘There was a lot of surface water on the road, but suddenly water started coming in and it was quite frightening,’ she told The Southern Star. ‘I told the older two children, aged six and nine, to get up onto the back window, because we were getting saturated in the front,’ said Rose.

‘It was scary when I couldn’t open the door, but my priority was to keep the children calm because if I panicked, then they would have too. Once I knew we couldn’t get out, I rang the emergency services and they were great and they kept phoning me back until rescue services arrived.’

Rose and the three children were in the water-filled car for close to an hour and she was relieved to see the Fire Brigade arrive so quickly after she made the initial 999 call.

‘We could hear the sirens and then the voices and then we knew we would be safe. Five firemen got us out of the car and we were saturated, but we were wrapped in foil and blankets to keep warm and the children even got to wear the firemen’s helmets.’

Two ambulances, as well as the gardaí and West Cork Rapid Response were also at the scene, and Rose and the three children were treated for hypothermia, but did not need hospitalisation.

‘Thankfully all four of us were fine and we were dropped home. The children said that it was an adventurous day and that they couldn’t wait to go to school the day after to tell them their news. I think the shock of what happened only hit me the day after it, ’ said Rose.

Dan McCarthy, station officer with Dunmanway Fire Brigade, said that it could have been a tragic disaster.

‘What saved them is that the strong current jammed Rose’s car against the ditch which meant the car wasn’t swept into the river. It was a frightening scene to be honest, as the water was up to the steering wheel,’ said Dan.

‘This road is known for flooding, and if it had happened earlier in the morning when the water was higher, it could have been a tragic disaster.’

Rose had high praise for all those who came to their rescue.

‘The members of Dunmanway Fire Brigade are a total credit to the town. The professionalism, efficiency and calm manner in which they handled a very frightening experience, especially for the children, was second to none,’ said Rose.

‘I also want to give a sincere thanks to the ambulance crew and the gardaí who attended the scene and they were more than sympathetic and helpful, especially to the young children involved.’

By Kieran O’Mahony

A BALLINEEN woman and three children had a very lucky escape on Monday afternoon when their car was swept into flood waters.

The incident happened at Ardkitt near Enniskeane, where the Bandon River had burst its banks.

Rose Crowley was on her way to Desert Cross with three children at around 3pm when they drove through a narrow road that is prone to flooding.

‘There was a lot of surface water on the road, but suddenly water started coming in and it was quite frightening,’ she told The Southern Star. ‘I told the older two children, aged six and nine, to get up onto the back window, because we were getting saturated in the front,’ said Rose.

‘It was scary when I couldn’t open the door, but my priority was to keep the children calm because if I panicked, then they would have too. Once I knew we couldn’t get out, I rang the emergency services and they were great and they kept phoning me back until rescue services arrived.’

Rose and the three children were in the water-filled car for close to an hour and she was relieved to see the Fire Brigade arrive so quickly after she made the initial 999 call.

‘We could hear the sirens and then the voices and then we knew we would be safe. Five firemen got us out of the car and we were saturated, but we were wrapped in foil and blankets to keep warm and the children even got to wear the firemen’s helmets.’

Two ambulances, as well as the gardaí and West Cork Rapid Response were also at the scene, and Rose and the three children were treated for hypothermia, but did not need hospitalisation.

‘Thankfully all four of us were fine and we were dropped home. The children said that it was an adventurous day and that they couldn’t wait to go to school the day after to tell them their news. I think the shock of what happened only hit me the day after it, ’ said Rose.

Dan McCarthy, station officer with Dunmanway Fire Brigade, said that it could have been a tragic disaster.

‘What saved them is that the strong current jammed Rose’s car against the ditch which meant the car wasn’t swept into the river. It was a frightening scene to be honest, as the water was up to the steering wheel,’ said Dan.

‘This road is known for flooding, and if it had happened earlier in the morning when the water was higher, it could have been a tragic disaster.’

Rose had high praise for all those who came to their rescue.

‘The members of Dunmanway Fire Brigade are a total credit to the town. The professionalism, efficiency and calm manner in which they handled a very frightening experience, especially for the children, was second to none,’ said Rose.

‘I also want to give a sincere thanks to the ambulance crew and the gardaí who attended the scene and they were more than sympathetic and helpful, especially to the young children involved.’

By Kieran O’Mahony

A BALLINEEN woman and three children had a very lucky escape on Monday afternoon when their car was swept into flood waters.

The incident happened at Ardkitt near Enniskeane, where the Bandon River had burst its banks.

Rose Crowley was on her way to Desert Cross with three children at around 3pm when they drove through a narrow road that is prone to flooding.

‘There was a lot of surface water on the road, but suddenly water started coming in and it was quite frightening,’ she told The Southern Star. ‘I told the older two children, aged six and nine, to get up onto the back window, because we were getting saturated in the front,’ said Rose.

‘It was scary when I couldn’t open the door, but my priority was to keep the children calm because if I panicked, then they would have too. Once I knew we couldn’t get out, I rang the emergency services and they were great and they kept phoning me back until rescue services arrived.’

Rose and the three children were in the water-filled car for close to an hour and she was relieved to see the Fire Brigade arrive so quickly after she made the initial 999 call.

‘We could hear the sirens and then the voices and then we knew we would be safe. Five firemen got us out of the car and we were saturated, but we were wrapped in foil and blankets to keep warm and the children even got to wear the firemen’s helmets.’

Two ambulances, as well as the gardaí and West Cork Rapid Response were also at the scene, and Rose and the three children were treated for hypothermia, but did not need hospitalisation.

‘Thankfully all four of us were fine and we were dropped home. The children said that it was an adventurous day and that they couldn’t wait to go to school the day after to tell them their news. I think the shock of what happened only hit me the day after it, ’ said Rose.

Dan McCarthy, station officer with Dunmanway Fire Brigade, said that it could have been a tragic disaster.

‘What saved them is that the strong current jammed Rose’s car against the ditch which meant the car wasn’t swept into the river. It was a frightening scene to be honest, as the water was up to the steering wheel,’ said Dan.

‘This road is known for flooding, and if it had happened earlier in the morning when the water was higher, it could have been a tragic disaster.’

Rose had high praise for all those who came to their rescue.

‘The members of Dunmanway Fire Brigade are a total credit to the town. The professionalism, efficiency and calm manner in which they handled a very frightening experience, especially for the children, was second to none,’ said Rose.

‘I also want to give a sincere thanks to the ambulance crew and the gardaí who attended the scene and they were more than sympathetic and helpful, especially to the young children involved.’

By Kieran O’Mahony

A BALLINEEN woman and three children had a very lucky escape on Monday afternoon when their car was swept into flood waters.

The incident happened at Ardkitt near Enniskeane, where the Bandon River had burst its banks.

Rose Crowley was on her way to Desert Cross with three children at around 3pm when they drove through a narrow road that is prone to flooding.

‘There was a lot of surface water on the road, but suddenly water started coming in and it was quite frightening,’ she told The Southern Star. ‘I told the older two children, aged six and nine, to get up onto the back window, because we were getting saturated in the front,’ said Rose.

‘It was scary when I couldn’t open the door, but my priority was to keep the children calm because if I panicked, then they would have too. Once I knew we couldn’t get out, I rang the emergency services and they were great and they kept phoning me back until rescue services arrived.’

Rose and the three children were in the water-filled car for close to an hour and she was relieved to see the Fire Brigade arrive so quickly after she made the initial 999 call.

‘We could hear the sirens and then the voices and then we knew we would be safe. Five firemen got us out of the car and we were saturated, but we were wrapped in foil and blankets to keep warm and the children even got to wear the firemen’s helmets.’

Two ambulances, as well as the gardaí and West Cork Rapid Response were also at the scene, and Rose and the three children were treated for hypothermia, but did not need hospitalisation.

‘Thankfully all four of us were fine and we were dropped home. The children said that it was an adventurous day and that they couldn’t wait to go to school the day after to tell them their news. I think the shock of what happened only hit me the day after it, ’ said Rose.

Dan McCarthy, station officer with Dunmanway Fire Brigade, said that it could have been a tragic disaster.

‘What saved them is that the strong current jammed Rose’s car against the ditch which meant the car wasn’t swept into the river. It was a frightening scene to be honest, as the water was up to the steering wheel,’ said Dan.

‘This road is known for flooding, and if it had happened earlier in the morning when the water was higher, it could have been a tragic disaster.’

Rose had high praise for all those who came to their rescue.

‘The members of Dunmanway Fire Brigade are a total credit to the town. The professionalism, efficiency and calm manner in which they handled a very frightening experience, especially for the children, was second to none,’ said Rose.

‘I also want to give a sincere thanks to the ambulance crew and the gardaí who attended the scene and they were more than sympathetic and helpful, especially to the young children involved.’

By Kieran O’Mahony

A BALLINEEN woman and three children had a very lucky escape on Monday afternoon when their car was swept into flood waters.

The incident happened at Ardkitt near Enniskeane, where the Bandon River had burst its banks.

Rose Crowley was on her way to Desert Cross with three children at around 3pm when they drove through a narrow road that is prone to flooding.

‘There was a lot of surface water on the road, but suddenly water started coming in and it was quite frightening,’ she told The Southern Star. ‘I told the older two children, aged six and nine, to get up onto the back window, because we were getting saturated in the front,’ said Rose.

‘It was scary when I couldn’t open the door, but my priority was to keep the children calm because if I panicked, then they would have too. Once I knew we couldn’t get out, I rang the emergency services and they were great and they kept phoning me back until rescue services arrived.’

Rose and the three children were in the water-filled car for close to an hour and she was relieved to see the Fire Brigade arrive so quickly after she made the initial 999 call.

‘We could hear the sirens and then the voices and then we knew we would be safe. Five firemen got us out of the car and we were saturated, but we were wrapped in foil and blankets to keep warm and the children even got to wear the firemen’s helmets.’

Two ambulances, as well as the gardaí and West Cork Rapid Response were also at the scene, and Rose and the three children were treated for hypothermia, but did not need hospitalisation.

‘Thankfully all four of us were fine and we were dropped home. The children said that it was an adventurous day and that they couldn’t wait to go to school the day after to tell them their news. I think the shock of what happened only hit me the day after it, ’ said Rose.

Dan McCarthy, station officer with Dunmanway Fire Brigade, said that it could have been a tragic disaster.

‘What saved them is that the strong current jammed Rose’s car against the ditch which meant the car wasn’t swept into the river. It was a frightening scene to be honest, as the water was up to the steering wheel,’ said Dan.

‘This road is known for flooding, and if it had happened earlier in the morning when the water was higher, it could have been a tragic disaster.’

Rose had high praise for all those who came to their rescue.

‘The members of Dunmanway Fire Brigade are a total credit to the town. The professionalism, efficiency and calm manner in which they handled a very frightening experience, especially for the children, was second to none,’ said Rose.

‘I also want to give a sincere thanks to the ambulance crew and the gardaí who attended the scene and they were more than sympathetic and helpful, especially to the young children involved.’

By Kieran O’Mahony

A BALLINEEN woman and three children had a very lucky escape on Monday afternoon when their car was swept into flood waters.

The incident happened at Ardkitt near Enniskeane, where the Bandon River had burst its banks.

Rose Crowley was on her way to Desert Cross with three children at around 3pm when they drove through a narrow road that is prone to flooding.

‘There was a lot of surface water on the road, but suddenly water started coming in and it was quite frightening,’ she told The Southern Star. ‘I told the older two children, aged six and nine, to get up onto the back window, because we were getting saturated in the front,’ said Rose.

‘It was scary when I couldn’t open the door, but my priority was to keep the children calm because if I panicked, then they would have too. Once I knew we couldn’t get out, I rang the emergency services and they were great and they kept phoning me back until rescue services arrived.’

Rose and the three children were in the water-filled car for close to an hour and she was relieved to see the Fire Brigade arrive so quickly after she made the initial 999 call.

‘We could hear the sirens and then the voices and then we knew we would be safe. Five firemen got us out of the car and we were saturated, but we were wrapped in foil and blankets to keep warm and the children even got to wear the firemen’s helmets.’

Two ambulances, as well as the gardaí and West Cork Rapid Response were also at the scene, and Rose and the three children were treated for hypothermia, but did not need hospitalisation.

‘Thankfully all four of us were fine and we were dropped home. The children said that it was an adventurous day and that they couldn’t wait to go to school the day after to tell them their news. I think the shock of what happened only hit me the day after it, ’ said Rose.

Dan McCarthy, station officer with Dunmanway Fire Brigade, said that it could have been a tragic disaster.

‘What saved them is that the strong current jammed Rose’s car against the ditch which meant the car wasn’t swept into the river. It was a frightening scene to be honest, as the water was up to the steering wheel,’ said Dan.

‘This road is known for flooding, and if it had happened earlier in the morning when the water was higher, it could have been a tragic disaster.’

Rose had high praise for all those who came to their rescue.

‘The members of Dunmanway Fire Brigade are a total credit to the town. The professionalism, efficiency and calm manner in which they handled a very frightening experience, especially for the children, was second to none,’ said Rose.

‘I also want to give a sincere thanks to the ambulance crew and the gardaí who attended the scene and they were more than sympathetic and helpful, especially to the young children involved.’

By Kieran O’Mahony

A BALLINEEN woman and three children had a very lucky escape on Monday afternoon when their car was swept into flood waters.

The incident happened at Ardkitt near Enniskeane, where the Bandon River had burst its banks.

Rose Crowley was on her way to Desert Cross with three children at around 3pm when they drove through a narrow road that is prone to flooding.

‘There was a lot of surface water on the road, but suddenly water started coming in and it was quite frightening,’ she told The Southern Star. ‘I told the older two children, aged six and nine, to get up onto the back window, because we were getting saturated in the front,’ said Rose.

‘It was scary when I couldn’t open the door, but my priority was to keep the children calm because if I panicked, then they would have too. Once I knew we couldn’t get out, I rang the emergency services and they were great and they kept phoning me back until rescue services arrived.’

Rose and the three children were in the water-filled car for close to an hour and she was relieved to see the Fire Brigade arrive so quickly after she made the initial 999 call.

‘We could hear the sirens and then the voices and then we knew we would be safe. Five firemen got us out of the car and we were saturated, but we were wrapped in foil and blankets to keep warm and the children even got to wear the firemen’s helmets.’

Two ambulances, as well as the gardaí and West Cork Rapid Response were also at the scene, and Rose and the three children were treated for hypothermia, but did not need hospitalisation.

‘Thankfully all four of us were fine and we were dropped home. The children said that it was an adventurous day and that they couldn’t wait to go to school the day after to tell them their news. I think the shock of what happened only hit me the day after it, ’ said Rose.

Dan McCarthy, station officer with Dunmanway Fire Brigade, said that it could have been a tragic disaster.

‘What saved them is that the strong current jammed Rose’s car against the ditch which meant the car wasn’t swept into the river. It was a frightening scene to be honest, as the water was up to the steering wheel,’ said Dan.

‘This road is known for flooding, and if it had happened earlier in the morning when the water was higher, it could have been a tragic disaster.’

Rose had high praise for all those who came to their rescue.

‘The members of Dunmanway Fire Brigade are a total credit to the town. The professionalism, efficiency and calm manner in which they handled a very frightening experience, especially for the children, was second to none,’ said Rose.

‘I also want to give a sincere thanks to the ambulance crew and the gardaí who attended the scene and they were more than sympathetic and helpful, especially to the young children involved.’

By Kieran O’Mahony

A BALLINEEN woman and three children had a very lucky escape on Monday afternoon when their car was swept into flood waters.

The incident happened at Ardkitt near Enniskeane, where the Bandon River had burst its banks.

Rose Crowley was on her way to Desert Cross with three children at around 3pm when they drove through a narrow road that is prone to flooding.

‘There was a lot of surface water on the road, but suddenly water started coming in and it was quite frightening,’ she told The Southern Star. ‘I told the older two children, aged six and nine, to get up onto the back window, because we were getting saturated in the front,’ said Rose.

‘It was scary when I couldn’t open the door, but my priority was to keep the children calm because if I panicked, then they would have too. Once I knew we couldn’t get out, I rang the emergency services and they were great and they kept phoning me back until rescue services arrived.’

Rose and the three children were in the water-filled car for close to an hour and she was relieved to see the Fire Brigade arrive so quickly after she made the initial 999 call.

‘We could hear the sirens and then the voices and then we knew we would be safe. Five firemen got us out of the car and we were saturated, but we were wrapped in foil and blankets to keep warm and the children even got to wear the firemen’s helmets.’

Two ambulances, as well as the gardaí and West Cork Rapid Response were also at the scene, and Rose and the three children were treated for hypothermia, but did not need hospitalisation.

‘Thankfully all four of us were fine and we were dropped home. The children said that it was an adventurous day and that they couldn’t wait to go to school the day after to tell them their news. I think the shock of what happened only hit me the day after it, ’ said Rose.

Dan McCarthy, station officer with Dunmanway Fire Brigade, said that it could have been a tragic disaster.

‘What saved them is that the strong current jammed Rose’s car against the ditch which meant the car wasn’t swept into the river. It was a frightening scene to be honest, as the water was up to the steering wheel,’ said Dan.

‘This road is known for flooding, and if it had happened earlier in the morning when the water was higher, it could have been a tragic disaster.’

Rose had high praise for all those who came to their rescue.

‘The members of Dunmanway Fire Brigade are a total credit to the town. The professionalism, efficiency and calm manner in which they handled a very frightening experience, especially for the children, was second to none,’ said Rose.

‘I also want to give a sincere thanks to the ambulance crew and the gardaí who attended the scene and they were more than sympathetic and helpful, especially to the young children involved.’

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