News

Beara children find 13 year old message in a bottle from US

September 27th, 2015 7:10 AM

By Southern Star Team

Share this article

By Helen Riddell

THREE Beara children have found a message in a bottle which has been making its way across the Atlantic for the past 13 years.

The trio, two sisters and their brother, are pupils at Scoil an Chroí Ró Naofa national school in Castletownbere. They believe the bottle travelled three and a half thousand miles to the strand on the Beara peninsula.

The message was found by the Murphy family – sisters Sinead (8), Juileann (6) and their brother Fionn (4) – at their Uncle Liam’s slipway, near Trahalan Strand, just outside Castletownbere.

On a visit to their uncle at the end of last month, they spotted the bottle in the water. When they pulled it out, they could see a message inside. Although intrigued by the bottle, the children waited patiently until they went back to school this month, so they could share its opening with friends and teachers.

School principal Ann McNally said that with the entire school present, and with the help of one of the teachers, the bottle was opened and the message carefully extracted. The message revealed that it was dropped into the ocean just off the town of Beaufort in North Carolina on April 17th 2003 by a Yorkshire child, Antoin Connell, who was on a school exchange.

Antoin was a pupil from Rastrick High School in Brighouse – a town in West Yorkshire. At the time, Antoin had been on an exchange visit to Beaufort Middle School in North Carolina.

The school was researching a project on the Gulf Stream at the time. As the Gulf Stream current passes close to the Carolina shore, it was decided to release a number of bottles containing messages to see how far they would travel on their way to Europe.

Some of the parents of pupils at Beaufort Middle School were fishermen and agreed to drop the bottles into the sea from their trawlers. A message in the bottle, asked anyone who found it in the US to let it continue its journey to Europe.

The trio have emailed the address in the message, mentioning that they, too, live in a fishing community. They are now awaiting a reply, and will return the bottle to the sea with their own message.

By Helen Riddell

THREE Beara children have found a message in a bottle which has been making its way across the Atlantic for the past 13 years.

The trio, two sisters and their brother, are pupils at Scoil an Chroí Ró Naofa national school in Castletownbere. They believe the bottle travelled three and a half thousand miles to the strand on the Beara peninsula.

The message was found by the Murphy family – sisters Sinead (8), Juileann (6) and their brother Fionn (4) – at their Uncle Liam’s slipway, near Trahalan Strand, just outside Castletownbere.

On a visit to their uncle at the end of last month, they spotted the bottle in the water. When they pulled it out, they could see a message inside. Although intrigued by the bottle, the children waited patiently until they went back to school this month, so they could share its opening with friends and teachers.

School principal Ann McNally said that with the entire school present, and with the help of one of the teachers, the bottle was opened and the message carefully extracted. The message revealed that it was dropped into the ocean just off the town of Beaufort in North Carolina on April 17th 2003 by a Yorkshire child, Antoin Connell, who was on a school exchange.

Antoin was a pupil from Rastrick High School in Brighouse – a town in West Yorkshire. At the time, Antoin had been on an exchange visit to Beaufort Middle School in North Carolina.

The school was researching a project on the Gulf Stream at the time. As the Gulf Stream current passes close to the Carolina shore, it was decided to release a number of bottles containing messages to see how far they would travel on their way to Europe.

Some of the parents of pupils at Beaufort Middle School were fishermen and agreed to drop the bottles into the sea from their trawlers. A message in the bottle, asked anyone who found it in the US to let it continue its journey to Europe.

The trio have emailed the address in the message, mentioning that they, too, live in a fishing community. They are now awaiting a reply, and will return the bottle to the sea with their own message.

By Helen Riddell

THREE Beara children have found a message in a bottle which has been making its way across the Atlantic for the past 13 years.

The trio, two sisters and their brother, are pupils at Scoil an Chroí Ró Naofa national school in Castletownbere. They believe the bottle travelled three and a half thousand miles to the strand on the Beara peninsula.

The message was found by the Murphy family – sisters Sinead (8), Juileann (6) and their brother Fionn (4) – at their Uncle Liam’s slipway, near Trahalan Strand, just outside Castletownbere.

On a visit to their uncle at the end of last month, they spotted the bottle in the water. When they pulled it out, they could see a message inside. Although intrigued by the bottle, the children waited patiently until they went back to school this month, so they could share its opening with friends and teachers.

School principal Ann McNally said that with the entire school present, and with the help of one of the teachers, the bottle was opened and the message carefully extracted. The message revealed that it was dropped into the ocean just off the town of Beaufort in North Carolina on April 17th 2003 by a Yorkshire child, Antoin Connell, who was on a school exchange.

Antoin was a pupil from Rastrick High School in Brighouse – a town in West Yorkshire. At the time, Antoin had been on an exchange visit to Beaufort Middle School in North Carolina.

The school was researching a project on the Gulf Stream at the time. As the Gulf Stream current passes close to the Carolina shore, it was decided to release a number of bottles containing messages to see how far they would travel on their way to Europe.

Some of the parents of pupils at Beaufort Middle School were fishermen and agreed to drop the bottles into the sea from their trawlers. A message in the bottle, asked anyone who found it in the US to let it continue its journey to Europe.

The trio have emailed the address in the message, mentioning that they, too, live in a fishing community. They are now awaiting a reply, and will return the bottle to the sea with their own message.

By Helen Riddell

THREE Beara children have found a message in a bottle which has been making its way across the Atlantic for the past 13 years.

The trio, two sisters and their brother, are pupils at Scoil an Chroí Ró Naofa national school in Castletownbere. They believe the bottle travelled three and a half thousand miles to the strand on the Beara peninsula.

The message was found by the Murphy family – sisters Sinead (8), Juileann (6) and their brother Fionn (4) – at their Uncle Liam’s slipway, near Trahalan Strand, just outside Castletownbere.

On a visit to their uncle at the end of last month, they spotted the bottle in the water. When they pulled it out, they could see a message inside. Although intrigued by the bottle, the children waited patiently until they went back to school this month, so they could share its opening with friends and teachers.

School principal Ann McNally said that with the entire school present, and with the help of one of the teachers, the bottle was opened and the message carefully extracted. The message revealed that it was dropped into the ocean just off the town of Beaufort in North Carolina on April 17th 2003 by a Yorkshire child, Antoin Connell, who was on a school exchange.

Antoin was a pupil from Rastrick High School in Brighouse – a town in West Yorkshire. At the time, Antoin had been on an exchange visit to Beaufort Middle School in North Carolina.

The school was researching a project on the Gulf Stream at the time. As the Gulf Stream current passes close to the Carolina shore, it was decided to release a number of bottles containing messages to see how far they would travel on their way to Europe.

Some of the parents of pupils at Beaufort Middle School were fishermen and agreed to drop the bottles into the sea from their trawlers. A message in the bottle, asked anyone who found it in the US to let it continue its journey to Europe.

The trio have emailed the address in the message, mentioning that they, too, live in a fishing community. They are now awaiting a reply, and will return the bottle to the sea with their own message.

By Helen Riddell

THREE Beara children have found a message in a bottle which has been making its way across the Atlantic for the past 13 years.

The trio, two sisters and their brother, are pupils at Scoil an Chroí Ró Naofa national school in Castletownbere. They believe the bottle travelled three and a half thousand miles to the strand on the Beara peninsula.

The message was found by the Murphy family – sisters Sinead (8), Juileann (6) and their brother Fionn (4) – at their Uncle Liam’s slipway, near Trahalan Strand, just outside Castletownbere.

On a visit to their uncle at the end of last month, they spotted the bottle in the water. When they pulled it out, they could see a message inside. Although intrigued by the bottle, the children waited patiently until they went back to school this month, so they could share its opening with friends and teachers.

School principal Ann McNally said that with the entire school present, and with the help of one of the teachers, the bottle was opened and the message carefully extracted. The message revealed that it was dropped into the ocean just off the town of Beaufort in North Carolina on April 17th 2003 by a Yorkshire child, Antoin Connell, who was on a school exchange.

Antoin was a pupil from Rastrick High School in Brighouse – a town in West Yorkshire. At the time, Antoin had been on an exchange visit to Beaufort Middle School in North Carolina.

The school was researching a project on the Gulf Stream at the time. As the Gulf Stream current passes close to the Carolina shore, it was decided to release a number of bottles containing messages to see how far they would travel on their way to Europe.

Some of the parents of pupils at Beaufort Middle School were fishermen and agreed to drop the bottles into the sea from their trawlers. A message in the bottle, asked anyone who found it in the US to let it continue its journey to Europe.

The trio have emailed the address in the message, mentioning that they, too, live in a fishing community. They are now awaiting a reply, and will return the bottle to the sea with their own message.

By Helen Riddell

THREE Beara children have found a message in a bottle which has been making its way across the Atlantic for the past 13 years.

The trio, two sisters and their brother, are pupils at Scoil an Chroí Ró Naofa national school in Castletownbere. They believe the bottle travelled three and a half thousand miles to the strand on the Beara peninsula.

The message was found by the Murphy family – sisters Sinead (8), Juileann (6) and their brother Fionn (4) – at their Uncle Liam’s slipway, near Trahalan Strand, just outside Castletownbere.

On a visit to their uncle at the end of last month, they spotted the bottle in the water. When they pulled it out, they could see a message inside. Although intrigued by the bottle, the children waited patiently until they went back to school this month, so they could share its opening with friends and teachers.

School principal Ann McNally said that with the entire school present, and with the help of one of the teachers, the bottle was opened and the message carefully extracted. The message revealed that it was dropped into the ocean just off the town of Beaufort in North Carolina on April 17th 2003 by a Yorkshire child, Antoin Connell, who was on a school exchange.

Antoin was a pupil from Rastrick High School in Brighouse – a town in West Yorkshire. At the time, Antoin had been on an exchange visit to Beaufort Middle School in North Carolina.

The school was researching a project on the Gulf Stream at the time. As the Gulf Stream current passes close to the Carolina shore, it was decided to release a number of bottles containing messages to see how far they would travel on their way to Europe.

Some of the parents of pupils at Beaufort Middle School were fishermen and agreed to drop the bottles into the sea from their trawlers. A message in the bottle, asked anyone who found it in the US to let it continue its journey to Europe.

The trio have emailed the address in the message, mentioning that they, too, live in a fishing community. They are now awaiting a reply, and will return the bottle to the sea with their own message.

By Helen Riddell

THREE Beara children have found a message in a bottle which has been making its way across the Atlantic for the past 13 years.

The trio, two sisters and their brother, are pupils at Scoil an Chroí Ró Naofa national school in Castletownbere. They believe the bottle travelled three and a half thousand miles to the strand on the Beara peninsula.

The message was found by the Murphy family – sisters Sinead (8), Juileann (6) and their brother Fionn (4) – at their Uncle Liam’s slipway, near Trahalan Strand, just outside Castletownbere.

On a visit to their uncle at the end of last month, they spotted the bottle in the water. When they pulled it out, they could see a message inside. Although intrigued by the bottle, the children waited patiently until they went back to school this month, so they could share its opening with friends and teachers.

School principal Ann McNally said that with the entire school present, and with the help of one of the teachers, the bottle was opened and the message carefully extracted. The message revealed that it was dropped into the ocean just off the town of Beaufort in North Carolina on April 17th 2003 by a Yorkshire child, Antoin Connell, who was on a school exchange.

Antoin was a pupil from Rastrick High School in Brighouse – a town in West Yorkshire. At the time, Antoin had been on an exchange visit to Beaufort Middle School in North Carolina.

The school was researching a project on the Gulf Stream at the time. As the Gulf Stream current passes close to the Carolina shore, it was decided to release a number of bottles containing messages to see how far they would travel on their way to Europe.

Some of the parents of pupils at Beaufort Middle School were fishermen and agreed to drop the bottles into the sea from their trawlers. A message in the bottle, asked anyone who found it in the US to let it continue its journey to Europe.

The trio have emailed the address in the message, mentioning that they, too, live in a fishing community. They are now awaiting a reply, and will return the bottle to the sea with their own message.

By Helen Riddell

THREE Beara children have found a message in a bottle which has been making its way across the Atlantic for the past 13 years.

The trio, two sisters and their brother, are pupils at Scoil an Chroí Ró Naofa national school in Castletownbere. They believe the bottle travelled three and a half thousand miles to the strand on the Beara peninsula.

The message was found by the Murphy family – sisters Sinead (8), Juileann (6) and their brother Fionn (4) – at their Uncle Liam’s slipway, near Trahalan Strand, just outside Castletownbere.

On a visit to their uncle at the end of last month, they spotted the bottle in the water. When they pulled it out, they could see a message inside. Although intrigued by the bottle, the children waited patiently until they went back to school this month, so they could share its opening with friends and teachers.

School principal Ann McNally said that with the entire school present, and with the help of one of the teachers, the bottle was opened and the message carefully extracted. The message revealed that it was dropped into the ocean just off the town of Beaufort in North Carolina on April 17th 2003 by a Yorkshire child, Antoin Connell, who was on a school exchange.

Antoin was a pupil from Rastrick High School in Brighouse – a town in West Yorkshire. At the time, Antoin had been on an exchange visit to Beaufort Middle School in North Carolina.

The school was researching a project on the Gulf Stream at the time. As the Gulf Stream current passes close to the Carolina shore, it was decided to release a number of bottles containing messages to see how far they would travel on their way to Europe.

Some of the parents of pupils at Beaufort Middle School were fishermen and agreed to drop the bottles into the sea from their trawlers. A message in the bottle, asked anyone who found it in the US to let it continue its journey to Europe.

The trio have emailed the address in the message, mentioning that they, too, live in a fishing community. They are now awaiting a reply, and will return the bottle to the sea with their own message.

By Helen Riddell

THREE Beara children have found a message in a bottle which has been making its way across the Atlantic for the past 13 years.

The trio, two sisters and their brother, are pupils at Scoil an Chroí Ró Naofa national school in Castletownbere. They believe the bottle travelled three and a half thousand miles to the strand on the Beara peninsula.

The message was found by the Murphy family – sisters Sinead (8), Juileann (6) and their brother Fionn (4) – at their Uncle Liam’s slipway, near Trahalan Strand, just outside Castletownbere.

On a visit to their uncle at the end of last month, they spotted the bottle in the water. When they pulled it out, they could see a message inside. Although intrigued by the bottle, the children waited patiently until they went back to school this month, so they could share its opening with friends and teachers.

School principal Ann McNally said that with the entire school present, and with the help of one of the teachers, the bottle was opened and the message carefully extracted. The message revealed that it was dropped into the ocean just off the town of Beaufort in North Carolina on April 17th 2003 by a Yorkshire child, Antoin Connell, who was on a school exchange.

Antoin was a pupil from Rastrick High School in Brighouse – a town in West Yorkshire. At the time, Antoin had been on an exchange visit to Beaufort Middle School in North Carolina.

The school was researching a project on the Gulf Stream at the time. As the Gulf Stream current passes close to the Carolina shore, it was decided to release a number of bottles containing messages to see how far they would travel on their way to Europe.

Some of the parents of pupils at Beaufort Middle School were fishermen and agreed to drop the bottles into the sea from their trawlers. A message in the bottle, asked anyone who found it in the US to let it continue its journey to Europe.

The trio have emailed the address in the message, mentioning that they, too, live in a fishing community. They are now awaiting a reply, and will return the bottle to the sea with their own message.

Share this article

Related content

Subscribe

to our mailing list for the latest news and sport:

Thank You!

You have successfully been subscribed to SouthernStar newsletter!

Form submitting... Thank you for waiting.