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  • News

Wall plaque marks grave of Irelands first female botanist

Thursday, 10th September, 2015 7:20am
Wall plaque marks grave of Irelands first female botanist

the new parking bay should alleviate the problem during rush hour at the school gates.

A LARGE crowd gathered last Thursday to see a plaque marking the unmarked grave of one of Ballylickey’s most famous daughters, unveiled in Bantry.

The plaque was officially unveiled by Con O’Rourke of the National Committee for Commemorative Plaques in Science and Technology. It’s the latest in a series of plaques that has been erected around Ireland to commemorate people who have made outstanding contributions in the fields of science and technology.

Ellen Hutchins, born in Ballylickey House in 1785, was Ireland’s first female botanist. She discovered many species new to science. She died in Ardnagashel just before her 30th birthday in 1815, and was buried in an unmarked grave in Garryvurcha graveyard in Bantry.

The Ellen Hutchins Festival took place during Heritage Week, to raise the profile of this pioneering woman whom history had largely forgotten, as 2015 marks the 200th anniversary of Ellen’s death.

As a result of the festival, permanent tributes to Ellen are now located at her burial place in Garryvurcha and her birthplace in Ballylickey. As well as unveiling plaques, the Ellen Hutchins Festival involved a series of 12 walks and talks, which attracted a combined attendance of more than 700 people.

Many at the events were from West Cork but there was a significant number of people from further afield, including Dublin, Meath, Galway, Kerry, Cork city and the UK. The festival also attracted attention in local and national media, including RTÉ Radio One, Radio Kerry Radio, TG4 Nuacht and The Irish Times.

As a result of the festival, many more people are now aware of this important West Cork historical figure, both locally and nationally.

Meanwhile, two Ellen Hutchins exhibitions are ongoing. The first exhibition is about Ellen’s life and work, and is on display in Bantry Library, written by Madeline Hutchins (Ellen Hutchins’ great great grand niece) and designed by Bantry-based Jenny Dempsey.

Librarian Noel O’Mahoney reports that the exhibition is attracting a great deal of interest and positive comments. It continues until Saturday September 12th. Meanwhile, a series of Ellen’s exquisite seaweed drawings is being exhibited on the Upper Landing of Bantry House until Saturday September 5th (normal entrance fee to Bantry House applies).

The festival organisers Madeline Hutchins, Clare Heardman (National Parks & Wildlife Service) and Angela O’Donovan (Bantry Historical Society) would like to thank everyone who made the festival such a success, including sponsors The Heritage Council, Cork County Council, NPWS, Bantry Bay Port Company, Bantry Development and Tourism Association, Ballylickey Tourism and Development Association and the Bantry Charity Shop.

A LARGE crowd gathered last Thursday to see a plaque marking the unmarked grave of one of Ballylickey’s most famous daughters, unveiled in Bantry.

The plaque was officially unveiled by Con O’Rourke of the National Committee for Commemorative Plaques in Science and Technology. It’s the latest in a series of plaques that has been erected around Ireland to commemorate people who have made outstanding contributions in the fields of science and technology.

Ellen Hutchins, born in Ballylickey House in 1785, was Ireland’s first female botanist. She discovered many species new to science. She died in Ardnagashel just before her 30th birthday in 1815, and was buried in an unmarked grave in Garryvurcha graveyard in Bantry.

The Ellen Hutchins Festival took place during Heritage Week, to raise the profile of this pioneering woman whom history had largely forgotten, as 2015 marks the 200th anniversary of Ellen’s death.

As a result of the festival, permanent tributes to Ellen are now located at her burial place in Garryvurcha and her birthplace in Ballylickey. As well as unveiling plaques, the Ellen Hutchins Festival involved a series of 12 walks and talks, which attracted a combined attendance of more than 700 people.

Many at the events were from West Cork but there was a significant number of people from further afield, including Dublin, Meath, Galway, Kerry, Cork city and the UK. The festival also attracted attention in local and national media, including RTÉ Radio One, Radio Kerry Radio, TG4 Nuacht and The Irish Times.

As a result of the festival, many more people are now aware of this important West Cork historical figure, both locally and nationally.

Meanwhile, two Ellen Hutchins exhibitions are ongoing. The first exhibition is about Ellen’s life and work, and is on display in Bantry Library, written by Madeline Hutchins (Ellen Hutchins’ great great grand niece) and designed by Bantry-based Jenny Dempsey.

Librarian Noel O’Mahoney reports that the exhibition is attracting a great deal of interest and positive comments. It continues until Saturday September 12th. Meanwhile, a series of Ellen’s exquisite seaweed drawings is being exhibited on the Upper Landing of Bantry House until Saturday September 5th (normal entrance fee to Bantry House applies).

The festival organisers Madeline Hutchins, Clare Heardman (National Parks & Wildlife Service) and Angela O’Donovan (Bantry Historical Society) would like to thank everyone who made the festival such a success, including sponsors The Heritage Council, Cork County Council, NPWS, Bantry Bay Port Company, Bantry Development and Tourism Association, Ballylickey Tourism and Development Association and the Bantry Charity Shop.

A LARGE crowd gathered last Thursday to see a plaque marking the unmarked grave of one of Ballylickey’s most famous daughters, unveiled in Bantry.

The plaque was officially unveiled by Con O’Rourke of the National Committee for Commemorative Plaques in Science and Technology. It’s the latest in a series of plaques that has been erected around Ireland to commemorate people who have made outstanding contributions in the fields of science and technology.

Ellen Hutchins, born in Ballylickey House in 1785, was Ireland’s first female botanist. She discovered many species new to science. She died in Ardnagashel just before her 30th birthday in 1815, and was buried in an unmarked grave in Garryvurcha graveyard in Bantry.

The Ellen Hutchins Festival took place during Heritage Week, to raise the profile of this pioneering woman whom history had largely forgotten, as 2015 marks the 200th anniversary of Ellen’s death.

As a result of the festival, permanent tributes to Ellen are now located at her burial place in Garryvurcha and her birthplace in Ballylickey. As well as unveiling plaques, the Ellen Hutchins Festival involved a series of 12 walks and talks, which attracted a combined attendance of more than 700 people.

Many at the events were from West Cork but there was a significant number of people from further afield, including Dublin, Meath, Galway, Kerry, Cork city and the UK. The festival also attracted attention in local and national media, including RTÉ Radio One, Radio Kerry Radio, TG4 Nuacht and The Irish Times.

As a result of the festival, many more people are now aware of this important West Cork historical figure, both locally and nationally.

Meanwhile, two Ellen Hutchins exhibitions are ongoing. The first exhibition is about Ellen’s life and work, and is on display in Bantry Library, written by Madeline Hutchins (Ellen Hutchins’ great great grand niece) and designed by Bantry-based Jenny Dempsey.

Librarian Noel O’Mahoney reports that the exhibition is attracting a great deal of interest and positive comments. It continues until Saturday September 12th. Meanwhile, a series of Ellen’s exquisite seaweed drawings is being exhibited on the Upper Landing of Bantry House until Saturday September 5th (normal entrance fee to Bantry House applies).

The festival organisers Madeline Hutchins, Clare Heardman (National Parks & Wildlife Service) and Angela O’Donovan (Bantry Historical Society) would like to thank everyone who made the festival such a success, including sponsors The Heritage Council, Cork County Council, NPWS, Bantry Bay Port Company, Bantry Development and Tourism Association, Ballylickey Tourism and Development Association and the Bantry Charity Shop.

A LARGE crowd gathered last Thursday to see a plaque marking the unmarked grave of one of Ballylickey’s most famous daughters, unveiled in Bantry.

The plaque was officially unveiled by Con O’Rourke of the National Committee for Commemorative Plaques in Science and Technology. It’s the latest in a series of plaques that has been erected around Ireland to commemorate people who have made outstanding contributions in the fields of science and technology.

Ellen Hutchins, born in Ballylickey House in 1785, was Ireland’s first female botanist. She discovered many species new to science. She died in Ardnagashel just before her 30th birthday in 1815, and was buried in an unmarked grave in Garryvurcha graveyard in Bantry.

The Ellen Hutchins Festival took place during Heritage Week, to raise the profile of this pioneering woman whom history had largely forgotten, as 2015 marks the 200th anniversary of Ellen’s death.

As a result of the festival, permanent tributes to Ellen are now located at her burial place in Garryvurcha and her birthplace in Ballylickey. As well as unveiling plaques, the Ellen Hutchins Festival involved a series of 12 walks and talks, which attracted a combined attendance of more than 700 people.

Many at the events were from West Cork but there was a significant number of people from further afield, including Dublin, Meath, Galway, Kerry, Cork city and the UK. The festival also attracted attention in local and national media, including RTÉ Radio One, Radio Kerry Radio, TG4 Nuacht and The Irish Times.

As a result of the festival, many more people are now aware of this important West Cork historical figure, both locally and nationally.

Meanwhile, two Ellen Hutchins exhibitions are ongoing. The first exhibition is about Ellen’s life and work, and is on display in Bantry Library, written by Madeline Hutchins (Ellen Hutchins’ great great grand niece) and designed by Bantry-based Jenny Dempsey.

Librarian Noel O’Mahoney reports that the exhibition is attracting a great deal of interest and positive comments. It continues until Saturday September 12th. Meanwhile, a series of Ellen’s exquisite seaweed drawings is being exhibited on the Upper Landing of Bantry House until Saturday September 5th (normal entrance fee to Bantry House applies).

The festival organisers Madeline Hutchins, Clare Heardman (National Parks & Wildlife Service) and Angela O’Donovan (Bantry Historical Society) would like to thank everyone who made the festival such a success, including sponsors The Heritage Council, Cork County Council, NPWS, Bantry Bay Port Company, Bantry Development and Tourism Association, Ballylickey Tourism and Development Association and the Bantry Charity Shop.

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