Plenty to see and do at Skibbereen Arts Festival

BY JACKIE KEOGH

PEOPLE who love art, film, comedy and music will find plenty to see and do during this year’s Skibbereen Arts Festival, which runs from Monday, July 27th, to Saturday August 4th.

 

Skibbereen Arts Festival and Children’s Festival organising committee members pictured at the launch of the festivals at the Church Restaurant on Tuesday evening.
Skibbereen Arts Festival and Children’s Festival organising committee members pictured at the launch of the festivals at the Church Restaurant on Tuesday evening.
The chairman, Mr Brendan McCarthy, said: ‘Skibbereen is proud to host the fourth annual festival and to offer an exciting nine-day programme that is even more ambitious than ever.’

 

Every detail of the programme is available online – see www.skibbereenartsfestival.com – but for many the highlight has got to be the screening of Carl Dreyer’s Passion of Joan of Arc in the Abbeystrewry Church.

What has makes this offering such a masterpiece is that the script comes from actual transcripts of the trial, and its emotional intensity is conveyed by a ‘live’ score performed by the renowned composer Irene Buckley, soprano Emma Nash, and organist Rhoda Dullea. 

Another clear highlight of this year’s programme will be the showing of All Divided Selves, the acclaimed film by the Turner Prize nominee Luke Fowler, and its bold but brilliant portrayal of the life and work of the Scottish psychiatrist, RD Laing.

On Friday August 3rd, the German film director Corinna Belz will be in Skibbereen to provide an introduction to her inspiring film, Gerhard Richter Painting, which is about one of the world’s finest painters.  

Meanwhile, important Irish-made documentaries to look out for include: Apples of Golan, Hammer to Bell and an acclaimed film on KCAT artists entitled, Living Colour.  

The festival chairman, who is known for his own musical accomplishments, said he would also recommend catching Little John and the Highly Strung Orchestra saying: ‘it promises to be a special night of musical theatre.’

The masterful exponent of sean-nós song, Iarla O’Lionaird, is always a huge attraction wherever he goes: his appearance at the Skibbereen Arts Festival – in the company of the renowned guitarist,  Steve Cooney – means that this year’s tribute concert to the great music collector Canon James Goodman will be a night to remember. 

DJ Donal Dineen and the Congolese guitarist,  Niwel Tzumbu, will perform in Connolly’s of Leap, which has long been regarded as one of Ireland’s best-loved music venues!

And the comedian and writer Colm O’Regan will be returning to the Skibbereen Arts Festival this year, offering another night of hilarity with his new show, Ireland’s Got Mammies.  

In the visual arts department, the festival is pleased to presents West Cork’s inaugural – and rather wondrous – Museum of Miniature, as well as a collection of work from KCAT studio artists.

The Working Artists Studios Gallery will host a selection of artwork produced by Cúig: five artists of mixed abilities employed as artists in residence in Mayfield Arts Centre, Cork.  And, in association with the West Cork Arts Centre, there will also be new work by Amanda Coogan, David Bickley and Mary Wycherley.  

The chairman said: ‘there is all that plus  The Striolán Céilí Band, an evening with the fabulous ukulele player, Peter Delaney, theatre performances that will include a production of Yeats in Noh, and Ophelia, It’s your turn to Change Daddy and Delia Murphy.’  

Of course there’s more. Much more: there will be a sound installation by Mark Garry; and Skelligs Calling, a new installation by Chris Watson, Kevin Brew and Luke Clancy; an outdoor screening of the acclaimed new Irish documentary, Dreaming the Quiet Man, various art exhibitions; plus an animation workshop for teenagers; a film workshop by Corinna Belz and a Graffiti Workshop for teenagers – not to mention an action-packed Skibbereen Children’s Festival, which has a whole programme all of its own and starts on Monday, July 23rd.

< Back

Features